Monthly Archives: May 2009

Real Estate Insurgency, Part 2: Organizing the Cell

We can build on this! We can build on this!

We can build on this! We can build on this!

In part 1 of this series, I discussed the First Principle of real estate insurgency: Never Fight on Their Turf.  The extension of that principle meant that insurgents have to figure out how to outmaneuver then neutralize the primary advantage of Big Brands: breadth of brand (aka, brand recognition).

So let’s suppose you’re an insurgent and you have managed to outmaneuver and neutralize the Big Brand advantage.  Now what?  Since I’ve been watching some NBA Playoffs the last few days, I’m afraid you’re in for a lot of basketball analogies people. :)

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Deference to Presenters & Barcamps

Now that I have recovered, more or less, from RE Barcamp Philadelphia (great job, by the way, Bill Lublin, Kim Wood, John Lauber, and the rest of the REBC PHL gang!), I wanted to ask a question:

Are presenters at conferences owed any sort of deference by attendees?

I also present at various events and have come to realize after Philly why it is that I tend to enjoy presenting at REBarcamps: audience participation.  I love the energy of the room at REBarcamps, especially when the audience gets feisty.  When the disagreements and the sharp questions start, that’s when I start having fun.  True exchange of ideas and real learning seem to happen more when there is a bit of debate and disagreement, rather than when there is uniform head-nodding going on.

At REBC Philly, I had a great time doing an impromptu “debate” session with Eric Stegemann of Tribus.  People were interrupting both Eric and me, challenging our assertions, making us explain ourselves, and I’m pretty sure most of the room left disagreeing with me. :)  What a great time!  Total engagement, excitement, and energy.

In contrast, at other events where I’ve presented or spoken on panels or whatever, I often get the feeling that the audience mostly sits there passively hoping to learn some great piece of wisdom from the experts gathered on stage.  Even the setup at non-barcamp type of events is conducive to the notion that those who are presenting or speaking are teachers lecturing a bunch of students.

But what if the presenter is talking out of his ass?  Is the audience supposed to sit there deferentially?

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[7DS] Leadership in a Time of Cholera (cross-post)

Just posted on the 7DS Blog — Leadership in a Time of Cholera:

If you are the CEO, broker/owner, team leader, managing partner, or otherwise in charge of a real estate company today, this is an absolute must-read.  In fact, if you read nothing else this entire year, I recommend you read this fascinating article from A.G. Lafley, Chairman and CEO of Proctor & Gamble.

The article is entitled “What Only the CEO Can Do” but the insights and lessons Lafley lays out are really about leadership in time of trouble, when enormous changes coupled to internal lethargy are threatening to pull you down.  I think his advice, based on his hard-won experience as the CEO of a Fortune 500 company, widely admired for their marketing and product management expertise, is timeless and applies across all industries.  But right now, today, in the real estate industry, I think his advice is particularly timely and particularly relevant.

Read the whole thing; you won’t regret the time spent.

The following are our observations about the lessons that a real estate company executive — particularly the CEO/owner of a real estate brokerage company — can draw from Lafley’s article.

I thought it worth cross-posting, since I know quite a few of you are interested in management/strategy issues, and that quite a few of you are CEO/owners/leaders in real estate organizations.

Continue on to the post on 7DS.

-rsh

[Theory] Leadership in a Time of Cholera

A.G. Lafley, Chairman & CEO, Proctor & Gamble

A.G. Lafley, Chairman & CEO, Proctor & Gamble

If you are the CEO, broker/owner, team leader, managing partner, or otherwise in charge of a real estate company today, this is an absolute must-read.  In fact, if you read nothing else this entire year, I recommend you read this fascinating article from A.G. Lafley, Chairman and CEO of Proctor & Gamble.

The article is entitled “What Only the CEO Can Do” but the insights and lessons Lafley lays out are really about leadership in time of trouble, when enormous changes coupled to internal lethargy are threatening to pull you down.  I think his advice, based on his hard-won experience as the CEO of a Fortune 500 company, widely admired for their marketing and product management expertise, is timeless and applies across all industries.  But right now, today, in the real estate industry, I think his advice is particularly timely and particularly relevant.

Read the whole thing; you won’t regret the time spent.

The following are our observations about the lessons that a real estate company executive — particularly the CEO/owner of a real estate brokerage company — can draw from Lafley’s article.

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I’m Not A Business, Man, I’m a Businessman!

Im not a Realtyman, Im a Realty, Man!

I'm not a Realtyman, I'm a Realty, Man!

So earlier tonight, I asked a simple question on Twitter:

Question: How many of you Realtors have a business plan? How many years does it cover?

The answers I got were somewhat amazing.  The replies ranged from “I have a 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year business plans” to “Business plans are too complicated”.  What an amazing variance!

So I ask a follow-up question:

so for those who said they don’t have a business plan, or a bizplan that is defunct, how do you know you’re successful at any given time?

The answers were as follows:

twitter-bizplan

Such interesting responses there as well!

Realtors, it appears, have inverted the classic Jay-Z line, “I’m not a businessman, I’m a business, man!”  A realtor is not a business, man, he’s a businessman.

This… has consequences.

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